KernelPop

Tuesday, February 14, 2006

Contextual Video -- the gap

There is an interesting discussion of Exploding TV on A VC today. There is a response in the comments by Dave that claims that relevency in video advertising is the answer to free micro chunked copywrited video distribution

Who cares how long the ad is, as long as it is interesting and relevant? I've pretty much stopped watching live TV, and only watch pre-recorded shows via DVR. Well over 99% of the ads are skipped because I know that they are either not interesting or not relevant

I don't know if I agree with this or not, but it does present an interesting case for the convergence of a couple of peer-based concepts. Clearly, the answer is contextual advertising, which is not a new concept. Implementation in a video context is the tricky part.

Proper targetting requires that you understand the content of the video, at the very least. It could also require knowledge of the individual. Video content classification is much harder than text. You can't scan the content and dig out a relevency heierarchy.

The answer is in the tag. Social tagging can play both sides of this equation. Yourtube and the other social video services already build on the tagging concept. Tag clouds can provide the user component of targetting. The combination of content and user could provide advertisers, publishers, copywrite holders and distributers (social networks) an innovative and effective way to monitze micro-chunked video, if not full video.

Its almost a perfect web2.0 storm... and might actually stimulate this new distribution channel.

1 Comments:

  • At 2:03 PM, Blogger Dave said…

    Thanks for the link.

    My point is this: TV advertising is a blunt tool meant to convey a message to the broadest audience possible. But for busy, educated people, with money to burn, throwing ads that are not relevant is a waste of resources.

    Consider: I live in New York City and have no need for a car. A car company pitching its wares to me accomplishes nothing. So why do car companies insist on advertising to viewers in New York City? I doubt I'm the only person in New York who neither owns nor needs a car.

    Advertisers are always telling us they want to create relevant content that enhances their brand. Well, then, deliver it. Don't show me ads for cars or miracle cleaners or George Forman grills or whatever other piece of crap is being peddled.

     

Post a Comment

<< Home